Difference between revisions of "Falafel"

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Note: I prefer to use dried chickpeas that have been soaking over canned chickpeas.  I think the consistency comes out better.
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Note: I prefer to use soaked chickpeas over canned chickpeas.  I think the consistency comes out better.
 
I use kırmızı pul biber as the red pepper. Ground cayenne pepper may be too spicy.
 
I use kırmızı pul biber as the red pepper. Ground cayenne pepper may be too spicy.
 
I have also tried baking the falafel balls in the oven, which can also work, but you should be attentive to make sure they don't overcook.
 
I have also tried baking the falafel balls in the oven, which can also work, but you should be attentive to make sure they don't overcook.

Revision as of 14:33, 26 February 2013

I do not use standard measurements when making falafel. I use available ingredients and measure spices and flavors to taste. I encourage you to do the same. A strong food processor or blender is highly recommended for this recipe.

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Amylin's baked falafel with rice pilav and sautéed carrots

Ingredients

  • dried chickpeas, soaked in water overnight
  • onion, finely chopped
  • garlic, minced
  • fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • dried red pepper, to taste
  • ground black pepper, to taste
  • cumin powder, to taste
  • salt, to taste
  • a few pinches of flour or bulgur to absorb moisture
  • a lot vegetable oil for frying


Directions

  • After soaking the chickpeas, some people prefer to boil them for an hour to soften them even more.

This step can be eliminated if the chickpeas feel soft enough. They should not be as soft as when making hummus, though.

  • Drain water and blend chickpeas, onion, garlic, parsley, peppers, cumin, and salt in a food processor.
  • To absorb excess moisture, add enough flour or bulgur to form small balls. Set them aside on a baking sheet or plate.
  • While forming balls, slowly and carefully heat plenty of vegetable oil in a large steel pot on the stove. This process takes several minutes.
  • Using a slotted metal spoon, gently lower one falafel ball into the heated oil. The ball should start sizzling and there should be enough oil to cook it evenly on all sides.
  • If the oil is hot enough, you may add several falafel balls at once, stirring them gently. It should take only a few minutes to cook each one thoroughly until they are golden brown. Their color will darken once removed from the oil.
  • Once sufficiently cooked, remove the balls and let them sit on paper towels or newspaper to collect excess oil. Repeat the process until all balls are cooked.


Note: I prefer to use soaked chickpeas over canned chickpeas. I think the consistency comes out better. I use kırmızı pul biber as the red pepper. Ground cayenne pepper may be too spicy. I have also tried baking the falafel balls in the oven, which can also work, but you should be attentive to make sure they don't overcook.