Difference between revisions of "Water scarcity"

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(notes - vegan water savings http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-conservation-tips/ pakraw)
 
(modified for better viewing pakraw)
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On average, a vegan, a person who doesn't eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet.  That comes out to 219,000 gallons of water per year.  In other words the meat eating public owes vegans and to a lesser extent vegetarians a debt of gratitude because they are saving tremendous amounts of water for society.
 
On average, a vegan, a person who doesn't eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet.  That comes out to 219,000 gallons of water per year.  In other words the meat eating public owes vegans and to a lesser extent vegetarians a debt of gratitude because they are saving tremendous amounts of water for society.
  
     The water it takes to produce the average American diet alone—approximately 1,000 gallons per person per day—is more than the global average water footprint of 900 gallons per person per day for diet, household use, transportation, energy, and the consumption of material goods.
+
     The water it takes to produce the average American diet alone—approximately 1,000 gallons per person per day—is more than the  
     That quarter pounder is worth more than 30 average American showers. One of the easiest ways to slim your water footprint is to eat less meat and dairy. Another way is to choose grass-fed, rather than grain-fed, since it can take a lot of water to grow corn and other feed crops.
+
    global average water footprint of 900 gallons per person per day for diet, household use, transportation, energy, and the
     A serving of poultry costs about 90 gallons of water to produce. There are also water costs embedded in the transportation of food (gasoline costs water to make). So, consider how far your food has to travel, and buy local to cut your water footprint.
+
    consumption of material goods.
     Pork costs water to produce, and traditional pork production—to make your sausage, bacon, and chops—has also been the cause of some water pollution, as pig waste runs into local water sources.
+
     That quarter pounder is worth more than 30 average American showers. One of the easiest ways to slim your water footprint is  
        A cup of coffee takes 55 gallons of water to make, with most of that H2O used to grow the coffee beans.
+
    to eat less meat and dairy. Another way is to choose grass-fed, rather than grain-fed, since it can take a lot of water to  
 +
    grow corn and other feed crops.
 +
     A serving of poultry costs about 90 gallons of water to produce. There are also water costs embedded in the transportation  
 +
    of food (gasoline costs water to make). So, consider how far your food has to travel, and buy local to cut your water footprint.
 +
     Pork costs water to produce, and traditional pork production—to make your sausage, bacon, and chops—has also been the cause  
 +
    of some water pollution, as pig waste runs into local water sources.
 +
    A cup of coffee takes 55 gallons of water to make, with most of that H2O used to grow the coffee beans.

Revision as of 01:14, 24 November 2013

On average, a vegan, a person who doesn't eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet. That comes out to 219,000 gallons of water per year. In other words the meat eating public owes vegans and to a lesser extent vegetarians a debt of gratitude because they are saving tremendous amounts of water for society.

   The water it takes to produce the average American diet alone—approximately 1,000 gallons per person per day—is more than the 
   global average water footprint of 900 gallons per person per day for diet, household use, transportation, energy, and the
   consumption of material goods.
   That quarter pounder is worth more than 30 average American showers. One of the easiest ways to slim your water footprint is 
   to eat less meat and dairy. Another way is to choose grass-fed, rather than grain-fed, since it can take a lot of water to 
   grow corn and other feed crops.
   A serving of poultry costs about 90 gallons of water to produce. There are also water costs embedded in the transportation 
   of food (gasoline costs water to make). So, consider how far your food has to travel, and buy local to cut your water footprint.
   Pork costs water to produce, and traditional pork production—to make your sausage, bacon, and chops—has also been the cause 
   of some water pollution, as pig waste runs into local water sources.
    A cup of coffee takes 55 gallons of water to make, with most of that H2O used to grow the coffee beans.